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A review of Lies That Go Unchallenged in Popular Culture. By Charles Colson.

May 3, 2006

Tyndale House, 2005.

Charles Colson is a leading Christian commentator and apologist. His daily radio commentary, Breakpoint, provides short, punchy and pithy observations on the current scene, be it social, political, moral or cultural. His incisive commentary is fully informed by a thoroughly biblical world view. Thus he offers a good counter-balance to the relativistic, politically correct and postmodern mindset. Those who may have missed these radio commentaries (or simply prefer the printed word) will be grateful to see many of the better and more recent broadcasts collected into a single volume.

The commentaries are broken down into seven sections: individualism and rights; marriage and family; tolerance and society; the arts; Christianity and culture; the media; and spirituality in culture. Each section contains around a dozen of the short, but meaty, commentaries.

Taken together, the 90 or so pieces cover many of the current events and social issues being discussed today. With so much uninformed commentary, and/or viewpoints representing every perspective but that of biblical Christianity, it is good to see a decidedly Christian version of events.

In an age where truth is in short supply, where morality is hard to come by, and everyone seems to be doing what is right in their own eyes, the words of reason, wisdom and truth found here make for refreshing reading.

The trouble is, it is not just secularists who are so much in need of biblical truth. Many who call themselves Christians are also desperately in need. Too many believers have slavishly followed the trends of the world, instead of setting counter-cultural trends of their own.

This book will help believers to get back to where they should be, and will also help non-believers to rethink many of their currently held positions. It is time to challenge the lies that are so prevalent and pervasive in contemporary culture, and this volume offers a great place to start with in such an important task.

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